Author: William Guth

Tech Blog: Field Recording with Lavalier (TRRS) Microphones

Field Recording Tools: Based on A True Story It came to our attention recently that some faculty would like to record interviews with colleagues to include in their courses, a practice we highly encourage. As professional practitioners you have access to experts and colleagues with all types of experience who can add real world context and value to your course content simply by sharing a story. One such faculty was travelling on business and scheduled a meeting with a colleague who volunteered to give some real world context to important lessons in their course. As the meeting was somewhat impromptu,


Web 2.0 Digital Tools Selection Criteria

As an Instructional Technologist, receiving a daily barrage of emails from education tech companies is the norm. Each email offers a set of digital tools promising to “improve” the way our faculty deliver their content and “boost” our students’ learning outcomes to new heights. With each new day, there’s an opportunity to discover new tools and figure out whether these companies are really trying, or totally lying. One type of instructional technology that is specifically important to the School of Professional Studies is online presentation tools, and our biggest challenge comes when we try to introduce new tools into the


Screencast Software: Using the Right Tool for the Job

Until recently, voice over Powerpoint has sufficed for home-based and low-budget creators when it comes to producing lecture videos, downloadable presentations, and animated demonstrations. The Microsoft software, while clunky, is familiar to most people, somewhat easy to use, and absolutely, positively, the wrong tool for the job.   Yes, you can add photos and upload videos to Powerpoint slides. You can add or record audio content onto slides. You can also insert animations to give the appearance of movement and flow. All these functions, while convenient, result in oversized output files, some of which are proprietary and which cannot be


Ready, Set, Collaborate!

Designing and assessing group projects that promote meaningful learning experiences in positive collaborative environments. While students may groan at the prospect of performing group work, positive group experiences have been shown to contribute to student learning, retention, and overall program success. By working in collaborative groups, students can exercise a host of professional skills that can they can apply in the real world and reinforce knowledge and skills that are relevant to your coursework and curriculum. For Faculty, one benefit is being able to assign more complex, authentic problems than you could to individuals. This may introduce more unpredictability in


Using the Right Tool for the Job

Up until recently, voice over Powerpoint has sufficed for home-based, low-budget creators when it came to producing lecture videos, downloadable presentations, and animated demonstrations. The ubiquitous Microsoft software, while clunky, is familiar to most people, somewhat easy to use, and absolutely, positively, the wrong tool for the job. Yes, you can add photos, and upload videos to Powerpoint slides. You can also add or record audio content onto slides, though you cannot edit it. All these functions, while convenient, result in oversized output files, some of which are proprietary and thus cannot be uploaded to platforms like YouTube and Vimeo