Search Results for accessibility

Reflecting on the Loyola Digital Accessibility Conference

Introduction The Loyola Digital Accessibility Conference was organized by graduate students in the digital humanities program at Loyola University. The event drew presenters and attendees from all over the country, including a team who called in from University of California-Davis! Content Specialist Christine Scherer and Learning Designer Krissy Wilson represented the School of Professional Studies Distance Learning department on the Tackling Large Scale Accessibility panel. The presentations covered a wide range of issues, from accessibility of digital library resources to podcast transcripts to retrofitting inaccessible web pages. But there were common themes raised throughout the conversations. One theme was that


Spotlight on Accessibility – Captions & Transcripts: December 2017 Online Learning Webinar

In this month’s webinar, Content Specialist Christine Scherer explained the ins and outs of captions and transcripts. Topics covered included the benefits of captions and transcripts, how captions and transcripts are created, why scripting is so important, and different types of captioning. To learn more, visit the DL Website’s Accessibility page! You can view a recording of the webinar on Panopto.  


Web Accessibility: What’s the Law Say?

When talking about web accessibility, many people will reference the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as the law that requires websites to be made accessible. This isn’t an entirely accurate description, however. In actuality, there is no single web accessibility law or statute. Instead, the legal requirements of web accessibility stem from a patchwork of laws and court decisions, which can often lead to confusion when trying to enforce web accessibility standards–especially in higher education. Let’s try to demystify some of this confusion and go through the major laws that dictate web accessibility. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504 While


Vetting Web Tools for Accessibility

Recently, Instructional Technologist William Guth has written about Web 2.0 Selection Criteria, which help online learning faculty and staff select the best web tools for their course. One of those criteria is making sure that the tool is accessible. But how can you find out? Given the vast variety of tools available, it’s a tough question to answer. But there are a few things you can do to make sure that a web tool has some degree of accessibility for students. What does accessibility mean? In this instance, accessibility means making sure that a tool can be accessed and interacted


Spotlight on Accessibility – Alternative Text: May 2017 Online Learning Webinar

In May’s online learning webinar, Content Specialist Christine Scherer shared information on web accessibility in course design, specifically the use of alternative text to make images accessible to all students. Faculty were asked to think of alt-text for a variety of images, both straightforward and complex. A recording of the webinar is available on Blue Jeans. To learn more about accessibility, visit the SPS Distance Learning Accessibility page.