Author: Jackie Wickham

All You Need is an Oven and a Knife

A few holiday seasons ago, I received a great gift – the Pizzazz Rotating Pizza Oven! I came back to work after the holiday singing its praises and immediately began convincing all of my coworkers to purchase one.  My spirits were quickly dampened when one of my coworkers asked, “Does it do the same thing as my oven?” I stared blankly at him as he continued, “all of these different kitchen gadgets…they all do the same thing as an oven or a knife. All you need is an oven and a knife. Everything else just takes up too much room


Canvas Updates for Fall 2017

It can be difficult to stay up to date on both new and existing Canvas features! Here’s a quick rundown of some things SPS Online faculty might want to know about prior to Fall quarter. Contact Cards Canvas has recently introduced Contact Cards, which make it much easier to stay in touch with your students! From the People tab in Canvas, clicking on any student’s name now reveals a pop-up window on the right hand side of the screen with information about the student’s participation level, recently graded assignments, and a link to their course analytics. Most convenient, there is


Providing Great Feedback to Students: April 2017 Online Learning Webinar

In April’s Online Learning Webinar, learning designers Jessica Mansbach and Krissy Wilson and instructional technologist Jackie Wickham responded to recent student survey results indicating that students want more individual feedback from faculty, sharing six topics related to feedback for online students: Providing Useful Feedback Frequency and Timing of Feedback Getting Students to Use Your Feedback Tone and Bad Feedback Time-Saving Feedback Strategies Considering Feedback in Building Course Structure Faculty attendees also shared experiences and concerns related to providing feedback to students in the online environment. To view a recording of the webinar, click here. To visit the Canvas site displayed



Student-to-Student Interaction in Online Courses

Having worked in online education for the past five years, I was intrigued by Darren Rosenblum’s recent New York Times article, “Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom.” While reading it, Rosenblum’s observation of a colleague’s course, where laptops were allowed, stood out to me: “[The students] took notes when [the professor] spoke, but resumed the rest of their lives instead of listening to classmates.” At the School of Professional Studies, we focus on student-to-student interaction as one of the three types of interaction, along with student-content and student-instructor, when designing courses. Rosenblum’s observation that students didn’t value