Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer, Assessment

As a Senior Learning Designer in the School of Professional Studies, I collaborate with faculty as an advocate for curricular excellence, innovation in design and technology, universal design for learning, and superior student engagement and experience. I am also a Quality Matters Peer Reviewer. Please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or follow my Twitter account for Canvas tips, industry and university news, and live conference discussion.

Prior to joining Northwestern, I worked with faculty in a broad range of disciplines—from thanatology to business ethics to art history—as an Instructional Designer at another private, non-profit university in Chicago. Before immersing myself in instructional design, I worked as a teaching assistant, writing fellow, and bookbinding lab monitor, as well as a rare books cataloger, archive-scanning technician, and special collections assistant.

  • 2018 – MA in Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse – DePaul University (Anticipated)
  • 2017 – Online Teaching Certificate – Rutgers University
  • 2017 – Graduate Certificate in Instructional Design – University of Wisconsin-Stout
  • 2014 – MFA in Writing, with focus on creative nonfiction and poetry – The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
  • 2012 – BA in English, concentration in Children’s Literature – University of Florida

When I’m not working, I enjoy hiking, road trips, coffee, and hunting for textual fragments of glass, pottery, and porcelain that I collect at my blog, Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore.

Posts by: Kristina Wilson

7 Ways to Group Adult Students for Teamwork Online

Introduction In the School of Professional Studies (SPS), group projects are our bread and butter. That means team case studies, small group discussions, peer review, and other collaborative assignments. One question I’ve heard faculty members frequently ask their peers in course presentations is, “How do you group your students?” Everyone has a technique for doing it differently, based on any number of factors. How many students are in your class? How many students should be in each group? What if you have students “left over”? Should I group them with teammates they know? Teammates they don’t know? Teammates they choose?


Building Up to Big Assignments and Complex Tasks: Making the Case for Assignment Scaffolding

Introduction Do some topics or skills seem too large to approach in your course? Are your students struggling with time management? Do you want to provide students with thorough, meaningful feedback but find it difficult to keep up with all the grading? Do you want your students to learn more effectively? Assignment scaffolding could be the answer. Source: Pixabay What is assignment scaffolding and why is it important? Simply put, assignment scaffolding helps break down large ideas or tasks into smaller steps that build on each other. Consider the analogy at the root of the term. Scaffolding, like the multi-level,


A Few Big Changes, Lots of Little Ones: Updates to the Quality Matters Higher Education Rubric

Introduction In the summer of 2018, Quality Matters (QM) released the Sixth Edition of the Higher Education Rubric along with a Rubric Update course to help reviewers brush up on the changes. For the Distance Learning team in the School of Professional Studies, that’s a big deal. We use the QM rubric, a research-based set of standards for quality in online courses, to guide the design of new classes and help revise existing ones. At the end of each development cycle, all courses are reviewed by peer Learning Designers on our team as a way to provide feedback and ensure


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