Recent Posts

Welcome to Jeanne Kerl, Learning Designer!

We’re very excited to welcome Jeanne Kerl as our newest full-time Learning Designer! Jeanne began working as a freelance learning designer for SPS Distance Learning a few months ago, so we were already familiar with her work, her rapport with faculty, and her dedication to creating high-quality learning experiences for students. Jeanne has experience in both designing courses and teaching them, which will bring in new perspectives to our office and development process. We’re very happy to have Jeanne join the DL team!


Group Projects II: October Online Learning Webinar

For the October webinar, two members of the faculty in the Global Health Program presented group projects they designed and implemented. The solutions they developed, challenges they faced, and the lessons they learned are applicable to a wide variety of subjects. These experiences will be of interest to all faculty who want to develop effective and engaging group projects in their own courses. Dr. Kristin Darin provided an overview of her group project from MSGH 456: Access to Health and Medicines. She discussed the project design and highlighted successes and challenges to its implementation. Dr. Darin also explained how the project was recently modified


Using Game Concepts to Create a Gamified Online Course Template

We hear the word gamification a lot, however it still remains quite a mystery to many educators. As I have mentioned in past posts, Gamification is not simply adding games to courses, but is instead the utilization of gaming concepts in courses. So where exactly do you get started when creating a gamified online course template? My last post suggested that you think of your students as heroes and use their journey to come up with materials for your course. But you can also take things one step further and use game components (instructions, story, levels) to make your gamified


Reflections on the Loyola University Chicago Focus on Teaching and Learning Conference

Introduction Twice a year, the Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy at Loyola University Chicago (LUC) holds a Focus on Teaching and Learning conference where faculty and staff gather to share innovative teaching strategies and case studies. The goal of the event is to “contribute to a faculty and staff life that involves active scholarship, candid and vibrant collaboration, and innovative activities that reflect the University’s mission.” A cadre of representatives from the Distance Learning team–Learning Designer Jessica Mansbach, Information Design and Strategy faculty member David Noffs, and Learning Designer Krissy Wilson–headed up to Loyola’s Lake Shore campus in Rogers Park


Web Accessibility: What’s the Law Say?

When talking about web accessibility, many people will reference the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as the law that requires websites to be made accessible. This isn’t an entirely accurate description, however. In actuality, there is no single web accessibility law or statute. Instead, the legal requirements of web accessibility stem from a patchwork of laws and court decisions, which can often lead to confusion when trying to enforce web accessibility standards–especially in higher education. Let’s try to demystify some of this confusion and go through the major laws that dictate web accessibility. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504 While