Recent Posts

Current Events Activities in the Online Classroom

As members of an evolving and diverse learning community, it’s our responsibility to pay attention, stay informed, build cultural competency, and hone our digital literacy skills. It’s our responsibility to know and understand the implications of local, national, and world-wide events. What better place to practice those skills than in the classroom, where ideas are meant to be explored, challenged, and refined. Current events activities are a great way to get students thinking about and engaging with what’s going on in their field of study right now, while also bridging abstract theoretical concepts with application in the real world. The


OLC Innovate Reflection

During the week of April 4th through April 8th, I was able to attend the OLC Innovate Conference, which took place in New Orleans, Louisiana. I was there to present alongside Dr. David Noffs for our presentation “Game On: The Practical Application of Game Elements in Online Graduate Courses.” Not only did we present our ideas on gamification, I also attended sessions that expanded my view of how gamification can be applied to different courses. Both focused on the narrative aspect of gamification, showing ways that story elements assist in course design. The first, “What’s Your Story? Creating Narrative in


Providing Great Feedback to Students: April 2017 Online Learning Webinar

In April’s Online Learning Webinar, learning designers Jessica Mansbach and Krissy Wilson and instructional technologist Jackie Wickham responded to recent student survey results indicating that students want more individual feedback from faculty, sharing six topics related to feedback for online students: Providing Useful Feedback Frequency and Timing of Feedback Getting Students to Use Your Feedback Tone and Bad Feedback Time-Saving Feedback Strategies Considering Feedback in Building Course Structure Faculty attendees also shared experiences and concerns related to providing feedback to students in the online environment. To view a recording of the webinar, click here. To visit the Canvas site displayed


How to Ignite Students’ Learning Using Brain-Based Principles

What is brain-based learning and why do we care about it? With advances in brain imaging technologies and ongoing developments in cognitive research, there is a great deal of information available about how the brain works (Davis, 2008). Knowledge about how the brain integrates new information enables instructors to design courses that incorporate principles of brain-based learning (Clemons, 2005). Brain-based learning involves the use of  “instructional strategies designed for compatibility with the brain’s propensities for seeking, processing, and organizing information”  (Kelly, 2013, para. 3). The handy acronym IGNITE (intervals, grouping, novelty, interconnectedness, technology and time, environment) describes how to activate


Enter to Win an iRig Lavalier Microphone (by IK Multimedia)

The Office of Distance Learning is giving away an iRig Lavalier microphone that was graciously donated by IK Multimedia. In order to participate, faculty and students must visit our recent Field Recording blog post, read about and listen to the microphone comparisons, and reply to the post using the following criteria. Identify the mic you feel sounds best, and describe why. Describe what type of content you might compose if you had a mobile lavalier mic handy. Asking questions about field recording and equipment are encouraged, but not required. Replying to your colleague’s posts is encouraged, but not required. Winners