Tag: guest post

Looking for the Little Things in Big Data

This post was guest authored by David S. Noffs M.P.H., Ed.D.  Since 2001 Dr. David S. Noffs has worked at Columbia College Chicago as an adjunct faculty member in the Interactive Arts and Media department teaching sound design, web design and programming. In addition, he has worked at Columbia’s Center for Innovation in Teaching Excellence as an instructional technologist and designer since 2005. In 2015, David joined Northwestern University as a faculty developer in the School of Professional Studies teaching Information Design and Strategy. The importance of learning analytics I recently attended an online webinar on Canvas Analytics conducted by Jackie


NUIT Post Exchange: Designing Your Course with Mobile in Mind

This article was originally posted on the NUIT LMS blog on July 27, 2015. Students use Canvas on their phones. Some instructors do, but many do not. Instructors can make it easier for students to interact with the course via mobile. Here are some tips for making it easier to use your course on mobile devices: 1) Check out your courses using the Canvas apps (both for iPhones and Android).  Check out a past course to see where the problem areas are. 2) As you are building a new course, check out how it looks on phones and a tablet to see


Let’s Give ’Em Something to Talk About—Part II Writing Engaging Discussion Forum Prompts

Guest Post by: Leslie Fischer. Leslie Fischer teaches in traditional, hybrid, and online classrooms at SPS and Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. She has taught writing, literature, and communication at SPS for 28 years and has taught at the university level for 34 years.  Reach her on twitter @LeslieAFischer or by email at l-fischer@northwestern.edu. In a previous blog post, I wrote about the professor’s online presence in discussion forums. Part two focuses on writing discussion prompts that cultivate distance learning students’ active learning. Active learning depends on students being both socially and cognitively present; throughout the term, develop an array of


Let’s Give ’Em Something to Talk About Part I: Five Instructor Practices that Cultivate Online Discussions

Guest Post by: Leslie Fischer. Leslie Fischer teaches in traditional, hybrid, and online classrooms at SPS and Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. She has taught writing, literature, and communication at SPS for 28 years and has taught at the university level for 34 years.  Reach her on twitter @LeslieAFischer or by email at l-fischer@northwestern.edu.   When teaching an online course, the discussion forum is often your primary connection with your students. Thoughtfully and actively managing the discussion forums can elevate the level of course conversations. Unlike the casual comments that might get tossed off in the classroom, students whose comments are