Tag: technology

Vetting Web Tools for Accessibility

Recently, Instructional Technologist William Guth has written about Web 2.0 Selection Criteria, which help online learning faculty and staff select the best web tools for their course. One of those criteria is making sure that the tool is accessible. But how can you find out? Given the vast variety of tools available, it’s a tough question to answer. But there are a few things you can do to make sure that a web tool has some degree of accessibility for students. What does accessibility mean? In this instance, accessibility means making sure that a tool can be accessed and interacted


USB Mic Comparison

Would you agree that bad audio can ruin a good video, presentation, or recording? Most certainly. A few months back, we identified tools for recording interview audio on the go. Today, we’ll listen to and compare five USB microphones, illustrate their uses in online instruction, and identify a few principles that will help us get the best results. Why can’t I use a headset microphone? For web conference purposes, a headset microphone will suffice, but not for much else. Reason being? Bit Depth and Sample Rate. Combined, Bit Depth and Sample Rate are the principles at play when digitally capturing


Scripts, Images, Action!: Creating Quality Videos for MUS 370

About the course revision process The MUSEUM 370 – Museum Origins and Issues course is one of three courses in the Museum Studies Online Certificate Program and the first to undergo a revision process. The revision of MUSEUM 370 included conversion of lecture content into combination of rich content pages, audio podcasts, and weekly overview videos hosted by the course instructor. Consistent use of visual aids to add value to weekly roadmap pages One of the goals of the improved information architecture of the course site included using consistent visual communication to provide reinforce the context of the course topics


Enter to Win an iRig Lavalier Microphone (by IK Multimedia)

The Office of Distance Learning is giving away an iRig Lavalier microphone that was graciously donated by IK Multimedia. In order to participate, faculty and students must visit our recent Field Recording blog post, read about and listen to the microphone comparisons, and reply to the post using the following criteria. Identify the mic you feel sounds best, and describe why. Describe what type of content you might compose if you had a mobile lavalier mic handy. Asking questions about field recording and equipment are encouraged, but not required. Replying to your colleague’s posts is encouraged, but not required. Winners


Tech Blog: Field Recording with Lavalier (TRRS) Microphones

Field Recording Tools: Based on A True Story It came to our attention recently that some faculty would like to record interviews with colleagues to include in their courses, a practice we highly encourage. As professional practitioners you have access to experts and colleagues with all types of experience who can add real world context and value to your course content simply by sharing a story. One such faculty was travelling on business and scheduled a meeting with a colleague who volunteered to give some real world context to important lessons in their course. As the meeting was somewhat impromptu,